Tag Archives: Crime Factory

‘The novel is about making believe your world is real’: an interview with Peter Temple

The death of Peter Temple at the age 71 has robbed Australia of what is undeniably one of its most influential crime writers. His Jack Irish novels were made into a popular television show by the Australian Broadcasting Corporation. The Broken Shore, which won the coveted British Crime Writers’ Association Gold Dagger award in 2007 – the first Australian author to do so – and Truth, awarded the Miles Franklin in 2010, were significant works of local crime fiction that, arguably, helped usher in the popularity of literary crime fiction in Australia.

David Honeybone, former editor of the influential hard copy magazine, Crime Factory [the precursor to the on-line magazine which I helped edit for a number of years until it recently ceased production], and a fan of Temple’s work, interviewed the author for issue 2 of the magazine in 2010. As a tribute, Honeybone generously shared his interview, in which Temple recalls his national service in the South African Defence Force, his literary influences, the challenges of translating his uniquely Australian dialogue into other languages, and what degree of realism a crime author should be aspiring to in their work.

Peter Temple is a South African by birth and an Australian by choice. A former journalist, he is one of Australia’s most successful crime writers, having five times won the Crime Writers’ Association of Australia’s Ned Kelly Award.Read more

Shilling some new publications

CarnivalEvery now and again one has to do a post that is essentially just one big shill. Well, this is one of those posts. I have been meaning to update you for a while now about current and upcoming publications I am involved in. So, here goes.

Crime Scenes Stories


Crime Scenes stories
I alerted readers a while ago to a new anthology of Australian short crime fiction, published by Sydney based Spineless Wonders, and edited by Zane Lovett, whose debut crime novel The Midnight Promise won best first crime at the 2014 Ned kelly awards.

Last weekend I took part in the Newcastle Writers Festival, at which the anthology, Crime Scenes, was formally launched. I have a story in this collection called ‘Postcard From, Cambodia’, along side pieces by David Whish-Wilson, Leigh Redhead, Carmel Bird, Peter Corris, PM Newton and my partner, Angela savage.

Seriously, anthologies of Australian crime fiction are a rare thing, which makes this anthology something of a special event. You can order Crime Scenes for your Kindle or in paperback from Amazon here or you can buy it directly from the Spineless Wonders site here.

Crime Factory Issue 18

Issue 18 of the award winning magazine Crime Factory, which I co-edit, is out and contains the usual great mix of fiction, features and reviews.… Read more

Crime Factory Publications launches new novella, Freight

Front

A quick heads up that Crime Factory Publications, Melbourne’s only dedicated crime fiction publisher, will launch its latest ‘Single Shot’ novella, Freight, by Ed Kurtz, at Loop Bar, 23 Meyers Place, Melbourne, Monday October 13, from 8pm

Freight a hardboiled heist story set in early seventies Texas.

To Enoch and Doc, two down and out men working as railway brakemen in an impoverished Texas town, it seemed like a simple enough heist: steal the copper wire off a train in the middle of the night.

But the carriage contains more than metal. Soon lives are at stake and an unfathomable evil has to be dealt with. And there is no one in Blackwood, Texas for the job but a no-account ex-con.

Think Jim Thompson meets Sam Pekinpah and you’re getting warm.

We will also be celebrating the launch of issue 16 of our award winning magazine, Crime Factory. Plus it’s your chance to stock up on all our other publications, including our last novella, Saint Homicide, and hard copies of our super sexy adults only special issue, Pink Factory.

In addition, you’ll get the advance word about our exciting upcoming projects, including our first novel and our first locally authored novella, both scheduled for publication in early 2015.… Read more

Crime Factory issue 15 is live

CF #15 cover

Issue 15 of the award winning magazine Crime Factory is hot off the digital press and ready for you to feast your eyeballs on.

As usual, the magazine is full of great content, including my interview with the long time Bangkok-based author of the Vincent Calvino PI series, Christopher G Moore. I grill Moore about writing crime fiction in Asia, the role of the cultural detective and the changes he’s witnessed in Thailand and the surrounding region over the twenty five plus years he’s been living there.

Journalist and regular contributor Tom Darin Liskey recounts getting mixed up with bikers and drug dealers in St. Louis in his teens. Steve Peacock takes us through his difficult journal in seeking justice and peace after being shot in the line of duty. Dave Honeybone interviews the author of Tequila Sunset and The Dead Women of Juarez, Sam Hawken, Benjamin Welton dissects Lon Chaney’s silent crime film, The Penalty, and John Harrison guides us through the pre-Comics Code Authority American crime comic books. There’s also heaps of great fiction and one hundred percent sock puppet-free reviews.

You can buy the Kindle version off for $2 or the old-school print version for $8 here on Amazon, OR you can buy it directly from the Crime Factory Publications site here, in which case the great Satan won’t get a cent of your money.… Read more

The death of a bookshop: a tribute to Melbourne’s Kill City Books

KC 4

I love poking around in second-hand bookshops. The more disorganised and dishevelled, the better. I can’t remember the last time I found one with a curtained off section where they stashed the adult stuff, the pulp fiction and true crime, but those ones were best of all.

It’s always sad to hear about the closure of a second handbook shop and they’ve been closing with alarming frequency in Melbourne over the last few years.

The latest casualty is Flinders Books, which had operated out of the basement at 119 Swanston Street, for 18 years. Before that it had reportedly been a trading card shop, and going back even further, a rest and recreation area for military personnel after World War II.

Basement Books, located at 342 Flinders Street is, as far as I know, the last second-hand bookshop in the Melbourne CBD.

The reasons behind the closure are nothing new: changing book buying habits, including the rise of e-books, coupled with a massive rent increase, all of which, according to the owner, made the business impossible to sustain at its current location.

As if the end of a good second-hand bookstore is not sad enough, the passing of Flinders Books has a wider historical significance. For the last eight years of its existence it also hosted the remnants of Kill City Books, once Melbourne’s premier bookshop specialising in crime fiction and true crime.… Read more