Tag Archives: Eric Beetner

Continental Crime: A YouTube reading

In late 2017, LA based author, Eric Beetner and I discussed doing a crime reading reading on YouTube to mark the release of novels we both had coming out earlier this year through the same publisher, Down and Out Books. The idea sort of grew from there to encompass an author either based in or who had written fiction from at least one country in continent on the earth (with the exception of Antartica).

In addition to myself reading from Gunshine State and Eric reading from his novel, Rum Runners, the list includes Matthew IdenSteph Broadribb, Mike NicolElka Ray and Claudia Piñeiro.

For reasons which are obvious in retrospect, but didn’t seem so at the time, putting this together was not as easy as we thought it would be and took a long longer than we planned. In particularly, my take home lesson is crime fiction from Latin and South American is really underexposed outside that region.

Anyway we decided to call our YouTube reading Continental Crime. Hopefully you find a new voice you like and get exposed to the wonderful world of reading books from different cultures. A big thanks to Eric’s editing skills for pulling the final product together.

Enjoy.

Mid-summer reading report back: Perfidia, Japanese tattoos, eighties sleaze

Perfidia

Summer in Melbourne is usually the one time of the year I can be guaranteed to get a fair amount of personal reading done. As has become my annual practice, a short report back on the books I have got through is in order.

Perfidia, James Ellroy

I need to preface my comments on Perfidia by stressing I am a massive Ellroy fan. I have read all of his books – ALL of them – many more than once. I even liked The Cold Six Thousand and Blood’s A Rover, the two books that most divided readers. So, it is with a heavy heart that I say Perfidia is very disappointing. The long awaited prelude to Ellroy’s LA Quintet, Perfidia takes place in Los Angeles over 23 days in December 1941, a period in which American went from being at piece to the attack on Pearl Harbour and the country being at war.

The focal point of the book is the brutal murder on the eve of Pearl Harbour of a Japanese family. The killings have all the hallmarks of traditional Japanese ritual deaths. Drawn into the murder investigation are future LAPD chief William H Parker, the meanest crime fiction cop ever created, Dudley Smith, a brilliant young Japanese police forensic scientist, and Kay Lake, a woman with a major thing for bad men.… Read more

Ghost Money cover

I’ve been sitting on this for a little while now and figure a lazy Friday afternoon is as good a time as any to put it out there. It’s the draft cover of my first novel, Ghost Money, to be released as a digital book by US crime publisher Snubnose Press soon.

I think it looks great. I hope you do, too.

Here’s the pitch for Ghost Money.

Cambodia, 1996, the long-running Khmer Rouge insurgency is fragmenting, competing factions of an unstable coalition government scrambling to gain the upper hand. Missing in the chaos is businessman Charles Avery. Hired to find him is Vietnamese Australian ex-cop Max Quinlan. But Avery has made dangerous enemies and Quinlan is not the only one looking. Quinlan’s search takes him from the freewheeling capital Phnom Penh to the battle scarred western borderlands. As the political temperature soars, he is slowly drawn into a mystery that plunges him into the heart of Cambodia’s bloody past.

Ghost Money is a crime novel, but it’s also about Cambodia in the mid-nineties, a broken country, and what happens to people who are trapped in the cracks between two periods of history, locals and foreigners, the choices they make, what they do to survive

The person behind this design and the covers of most of Snubnose Press’s growing number of releases is the incredibly talented Eric Beetner.… Read more

Interview: Brian Lindenmuth, editor, Snubnose Press

Several weeks ago I posted a piece about my upcoming crime novel, Ghost Money and the fact it was being published digitally in the US. 

Given the interest that post generated and the debate in Australia about digital publishing and pricing generally, I asked my publisher, Brian Lindenmuth from Snubnose Press, whether he’d answer a few questions about the first anniversary of Snubnose, the controversy around e-book pricing and what kind of crime fiction he’s looking for.

And a heads up for those reading who are sitting on a crime fiction manuscript, for the first time in 2012, Snubnose are open for submissions. Check out the site for details.

What is Snubnose Press and what kind of crime fiction do you publish?

Snubnose Press is the ebook imprint of Spinetingler Magazine.  Spinetingler has been around since 2005 and we wanted to branch out into new areas.  While we are mainly a crime fiction press we are open to other types of work. For example one of our more recent releases, The Duplicate by Helen Fitzgerald, isn’t a crime fiction novel. The crime fiction that we do publish tends towards the darker side of the spectrum.

Why did you set up as a small digital press? How did you think you could add value in the current publishing climate?Read more

Crime Factory issue 9 is out

A quick heads up that issue 9 of Crime Factory is out.

Highlights include a full length interview with US crime writer Scott Phillips (whose excellent book, The Adjustment, I finally got around to reading over Christmas), fiction by Dan O’Shea, Tom Piccirilli, Ray Banks and host of others, as well as our true crime column, ‘The Deposition’ and a host of other material guaranteed to satisfy all fans of noir, pulp and hard-boiled crime fiction.

My regular column ‘Setting Sun’ focuses on the rise of South Korean crime cinema, with reviews of three films, The Yellow Sea, LEE Joeng-beom’s The Man From Nowhere, and one of the most controversial films to come out of South Korea, I Saw the Devil.

You can download issue 9 as a PDF at out brand spanking new site here. A Kindle version is in the works, and will hopefully be out in the next week or so.

The site also has a reprint of an interview from the Crime Factory vault with US writer James Crumley (author of crime classics The Last Good Kiss and Dancing Bear, just to name a few) and blogs by regular columnists, Ray Banks, Leigh Redhead, Eric Beetner and the Nerd of Noir.

And that’s just our opening shot in terms of what the Crime Factory gang has in store for you this year.… Read more