Tag Archives: Lenny Bartulin

A sit down with the Godfather: an interview with Peter Corris

As promised in my recent piece to mark the passing of Australian crime writer, Peter Corris, it gives me great pleasure to post a terrific, in-depth interview with the author that appeared in issue 14 of  the now defunct online journal, Crime Factory, in September 2013.The interview was conducted by avid crime reader and regular Crime Factory contributor, Andrew Prentice.

Crime Factory: Your pre-writing career was academia and journalism, wasn’t it?

Peter Corris: Yes

Where did the shift take place into writing novels?

I was working at the National Times when the first of the Hardy books came out, in 1980. I was the literary editor, sending the books out, doing the reviews, and also doing some interviewing pieces, sports people, politicians…and the first book was a success, very well reviewed.

That was The Dying Trade?

That’s the one. And I’d already finished the second one because I enjoyed doing the first one so much, and had started a third one, and well, the ball just got rolling, even though it took about 5 years for the first one to get published. I gave up the journalism and was bringing in enough from the books and writing short stories to get going. I should add I had a working wife as well, which was helpful.… Read more

My Summer appearances

SpaceAge big shopGreetings all, just wanted to drop by the site for a quick update.

One of the most popular articles on Pulp Curry so far has been ‘The death of a bookshop: a tribute to Melbourne’s Kill City Books’, which appeared here in July last year.

Given this, I thought readers might be interested in checking out a piece of mine that appeared in the Life and Style section of Melbourne’s The Age newspaper last weekend.

It’s an ode to three of Melbourne’s great bookshops, Kill City, Space Age Books and the wonderful Carlton Secondhand Books, all of which have closed. Space Age Books closed in the late eighties. Kill City shut its doors in 2005. Carlton Secondhand Books stopped operating at the end of last year.

You can find the piece on-line here.

While I’m pulling on your coat, I also have a piece in The King’s Tribune Summer Reading Special. It’s a look at one of the best local novels I read in 2013, Infamy by Lenny Bartulin, and the the status of the Western generally in Australian fiction and film. The issue is available to pre-order in hard copy from the the site.

If that’s not enough Summer reading, the Kindle edition of my crime novel set in nineties Cambodia, Ghost Money, is still available on the great Satan Amazon for just a dollar as part of Snubnose Press’s holiday sale.… Read more

My year in books

InfamyWill I ever come to the end of a year without the feeling I haven’t read nearly as much as I should have?

Unlike other years I’ve at least got a clear list in terms of my top five reads for 2013.

Here they are.

Infamy, Lenny Bartulin

Infamy is set in 1830s Tasmania. British mercenary William Burr is hired by the colonial government of Van Diemen’s Land to track down an escaped convict, Brown George Coyne. While Burr may be the hero of the novel, if one exists, Coyne and his Indigenous ‘wife’, Black Betty, steal the story. Coyne is a terrifying creation, a former convict, psychopath and cannibal, also a revolutionary working to unite a motley crew of escaped convicts with what’s left of the island’s Indigenous population, to overthrow the colonial government and rule as a self styled king of Van Diemen’s Land. 

Infamy is a superbly rendered piece of historical fiction, a dark, almost noir crime story, and a unique and unashamedly Australian take on the western. Possibly my best read of 2013.

Generation Loss, Elizabeth Hand

Cass Neary made her name in the seventies as a photographer of what was then the burgeoning New York punk movement. Thirty years later she’s a washed up, semi-alcoholic mess, when out of the blue, an old acquaintance gives her an assignment to track down a famous and reclusive photographer living on a remote island of the coast of Maine.… Read more

Crime Factory 8 is live

Crime Factory 8 is now out and available here.

Highlights include an interview with the author of De Luxe, Lenny Bartulin, and Tokyo Vice, Jake Adelstein.

There’s short fiction from Seth Harwood, Health Lowrance (whose book, The Bastard Hand, I reviewed on this site recently), and Julia Madeleine.

My column on Asian crime fiction and film, Setting Sun, looks at the 1981 noir Cutter’s Way, and the 1978 film, Who’ll Stop the Rain, both of which dealt with the legacy of the Vietnam War. Cutter’s Way is based on Cutter and Bone by Newton Thornburg whose death earlier this year went largely unnoticed. Who’ll Stop the Rain is adapted from Robert Stone’s wonderful 1974 book, Dog Soldiers.

There’s also reviews, the Nerd of Noir, our True Crime Factory column and a whole lot more.

Check it out.

And while I’m on the subject, big things are going down at on the Factory floor. We’e currently re-designing our website and have got a number of other projects on the go. It’s top secret, hush hush and all that, so you’ll have to watch this space as details are slowly revealed over the coming months.